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Jaracal

Welcome

This website contains information on problem animal control with specific details on the calling method. After 15 years of hunting problem animals professionally, owning my own small farm/ranch and being involved in conservation as the Game Ranch Manager of a 33000 ha reserve in the Southern Free State since 2009, I have come to experience first hand the impact of jackal and caracal on small stock and game. The information contained in this website will help you understand the dynamics of animal damage control, predator behaviour and the myths surrounding the killing of predators and the influence on the environment on killing and non killing of small predators.

Introduction

With financial losses of more than 1.1 Billion Rand to small stock farmers due to predation, South Africa farmers have a serious problem which cannot be ignored. (Research - Van Niekerk, Taljaard, Grove and De Waal - 2008) The main culprits responsible for about 90% of all predation on small stock in South Africa are Black Backed Jackal and Caracal. They are medium sized predators found all over Southern Africa and are well adapted to survive. Although they are heavily persecuted, their number are continually on the increase and the IUCN list their conservation status as “least concern” for both species. Several factors played a roll in their survival. They were nearly wiped out in the early years (from 1950’s to the 1970’s) when netting was put up between farms and every farmstead had occupants. Jackals and Caracals were hunted by every means, poison, on horseback, driven hunts, traps, shot on sight and declared a problem animal. A whole generation of small stock farmers grew up without knowing what a black backed jackal looked like or had any losses caused by jackal. From the 70’s onward the whole farming setup changed as farms got bigger, fewer people lived on farms and maintenance to the fences were neglected. The jackal got a foot in the door and being branded a bad farmer if you had jackal on your property, farmer kept quite about losses and suffered in silence. Game farms started to rise up like mushrooms all over South Africa, with very little or no predator control, jackals again flourished and populations grew and will keep on growing as will be seen from research, simple calculations and commons sense.
“When possible, fish wild and remote places for in time, they too will disappear….” Ben Pretorius
The home of Animal Damage Control
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2014
Vue Panoramique

Welcome

This website contains information on problem animal control with specific details on the calling method. After 15 years of hunting problem animals professionally, owning my own small farm/ranch and being involved in conservation as the Game Ranch Manager of a 33000 ha reserve in the Southern Free State since 2009, I have come to experience first hand the impact of jackal and caracal on small stock and game. The information contained in this website will help you understand the dynamics of animal damage control, predator behaviour and the myths surrounding the killing of predators and the influence on the environment on killing and non killing of small predators.

Introduction

With financial losses of more than 1.1 Billion Rand to small stock farmers due to predation, South Africa farmers have a serious problem which cannot be ignored. (Research - Van Niekerk, Taljaard, Grove and De Waal - 2008) The main culprits responsible for about 90% of all predation on small stock in South Africa are Black Backed Jackal and Caracal. They are medium sized predators found all over Southern Africa and are well adapted to survive. Although they are heavily persecuted, their number are continually on the increase and the IUCN list their conservation status as “least concern” for both species. Several factors played a roll in their survival. They were nearly wiped out in the early years (from 1950’s to the 1970’s) when netting was put up between farms and every farmstead had occupants. Jackals and Caracals were hunted by every means, poison, on horseback, driven hunts, traps, shot on sight and declared a problem animal. A whole generation of small stock farmers grew up without knowing what a black backed jackal looked like or had any losses caused by jackal. From the 70’s onward the whole farming setup changed as farms got bigger, fewer people lived on farms and maintenance to the fences were neglected. The jackal got a foot in the door and being branded a bad farmer if you had jackal on your property, farmer kept quite about losses and suffered in silence. Game farms started to rise up like mushrooms all over South Africa, with very little or no predator control, jackals again flourished and populations grew and will keep on growing as will be seen from research, simple calculations and commons sense.
“When possible, fish wild and remote places for in time, they too will disappear….” Ben Pretorius
Quis in dolor exercitation culpa qui culpa enim sit
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2014
Vue Panoramique

Welcome

This website contains information on problem animal control with specific details on the calling method. After 15 years of hunting problem animals professionally, owning my own small farm/ranch and being involved in conservation as the Game Ranch Manager of a 33000 ha reserve in the Southern Free State since 2009, I have come to experience first hand the impact of jackal and caracal on small stock and game. The information contained in this website will help you understand the dynamics of animal damage control, predator behaviour and the myths surrounding the killing of predators and the influence on the environment on killing and non killing of small predators.

Introduction

With financial losses of more than 1.1 Billion Rand to small stock farmers due to predation, South Africa farmers have a serious problem which cannot be ignored. (Research - Van Niekerk, Taljaard, Grove and De Waal - 2008) The main culprits responsible for about 90% of all predation on small stock in South Africa are Black Backed Jackal and Caracal. They are medium sized predators found all over Southern Africa and are well adapted to survive. Although they are heavily persecuted, their number are continually on the increase and the IUCN list their conservation status as “least concern” for both species. Several factors played a roll in their survival. They were nearly wiped out in the early years (from 1950’s to the 1970’s) when netting was put up between farms and every farmstead had occupants. Jackals and Caracals were hunted by every means, poison, on horseback, driven hunts, traps, shot on sight and declared a problem animal. A whole generation of small stock farmers grew up without knowing what a black backed jackal looked like or had any losses caused by jackal. From the 70’s onward the whole farming setup changed as farms got bigger, fewer people lived on farms and maintenance to the fences were neglected. The jackal got a foot in the door and being branded a bad farmer if you had jackal on your property, farmer kept quite about losses and suffered in silence. Game farms started to rise up like mushrooms all over South Africa, with very little or no predator control, jackals again flourished and populations grew and will keep on growing as will be seen from research, simple calculations and commons sense.
“When possible, fish wild and remote places for in time, they too will disappear….” Ben Pretorius
Quis in dolor exercitation culpa qui culpa enim sit